Look How Far We’ve Come!

With Airbus assessors gathered to evaluate our Round 2 teams’ projects, anticipation is building ahead of the announcement of the 5 final teams later this month.

Before the excitement of the final stages of Airbus Fly Your Ideas 2015, here’s a reminder of the impact of the competition, both within Airbus and in the wider world, since the first edition of the challenge back in 2008.

Look How Far We’ve Come!


With Airbus assessors gathered to evaluate our Round 2 teams’ projects, anticipation is building ahead of the announcement of the 5 final teams later this month. The winning team will be taking home a prize of €30,000 and the runners up €15,000. And of course, each of the 5 teams will get the exciting opportunity to pitch their idea to a distinguished panel of senior Airbus employees and other industry professionals. 

Before the excitement of the final stages of Airbus Fly Your Ideas 2015, here’s an insight into the impact of the competition, both within Airbus and in the wider world, since the first edition of the challenge back in 2008. 

A truly global competition

Over 4 editions, more than 15,000 students have registered to participate in the biennial Airbus Fly Your Ideas challenge, from over 600 universities. For Airbus Fly Your Ideas 2015, 518 teams representing 104 countries submitted an idea. The 100 teams selected for Round 2 comprised of 413 students and 48 different nationalities.

Diversity is a hallmark of Airbus Fly Your Ideas’ success – teams to date have featured students with a real mix of nationalities, both men and women and from a variety of academic disciplines.

Unique internal support

What sets Airbus Fly Your Ideas apart from other big student competitions is the degree of support and enthusiasm for the competition from within the company. Student teams working on innovative ideas for the sustainable future of aviation value the access they get to a dedicated Airbus mentor, as well as extra input from Airbus specialists and experts across the business. 

“It’s good to work with engineers of the future and understand how they see that future,” enthused one Airbus Fly Your Ideas 2015 mentor recently.

Within the company, the competition is viewed as bringing significant benefits to Airbus staff, who welcomes the out-of-the-box thinking from the young participants. Another mentor sums up the experience, saying: “It’s a great experience for all, which definitely adds to the motivation and innovation spirit, both inside and outside Airbus! 

Make sure to keep a look out on the Airbus Fly Your Ideas website, Connect@ and Lets connect as the five finalists will be announced very soon!


Counting Down: Your Round 2 Checklist

12 noon GMT on 30 March is a big deadline for Round 2 team hoping for a place in the Fly Your Ideas 2015 final. By this time, our teams need to have submitted their video, plus a report of no more than 5000 words and up to 4 appendices.

With only 5 places available in Round 3, don’t limit your chances of impressing Airbus assessors by making easily avoidable mistakes. For example, it’s vital that the title of your project is exactly the same as your original Round 1 proposal, that your report is no more than 5000 words and that you submit your report in PDF format.

Counting Down: Your Round 2 Checklist

12 noon GMT on 30 March is a big deadline for Round 2 teams hoping for a place in the Fly Your Ideas 2015 final. By this time, teams need to have submitted their video, plus a report of no more than 5000 words with up to 4 appendices. 

Round 2 teams are no doubt deeply absorbed in their projects – but remember that other readers might not be so familiar with your subject area. Make sure that you communicate your idea as clearly as possible – why not ask for feedback from someone new to the topic before you submit? Carefully structuring your report to reflect the evolution of your idea and the methods you used is really important.

As Assessors will not automatically review any appendices you might submit, you need to highlight in your report their significance. Appendices allow you to demonstrate the detail of your methodology or give more information on testing and results. For example, an appendix could show worked examples of the calculations and formulae you have used to determine the specific benefits of your idea.

With only 5 places available in Round 3, don’t limit your chances of impressing Airbus assessors by making easily avoidable mistakes. For example, it’s vital that the title of your project is exactly the same as your original Round 1 proposal, that the report is no more than 5000 words and that you submit your report in PDF format.  Why wait until the last minute to upload your work – no submissions will be accepted after the deadline, so give yourself time to sort out any possible technical problems and last-minute checks.

Finally, a word about plagiarism! Assessors will be looking for original thinking above all. It’s fine to reference other sources (the Knowledge Centre has a great deal of relevant information for teams to study) but it’s important that you give proper credit to other writers and researchers.  

With just 6 days to go, the clock is counting down – good luck to all Round 2 teams at this critical stage!

Reach out to the world through Social Media

Through their Teamlines, our 100 Round 2 teams are sharing the progress of their projects with the world via Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Let’s Connect. It’s a great way for teams to keep the international Fly Your Ideas community up to date on their ideas and the highs and lows of working together too.

Reach out to the world through Social Media

Through their Teamlines, our 100 Round 2 teams are sharing the progress of their projects with the world via Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Let’s Connect. It’s a great way for teams to keep the international Fly Your Ideas community up to date on their ideas and the highs and lows of working together too.


We caught up with Anthony Rosendo, Airbus Corporate Communications and Social Media Manager, to find out how a multinational company like Airbus uses social media to connect with a global audience. He says that, “Social media has helped us get closer to passengers, journalists and aviation fans. We can collect lots of interesting comments and experiences shared by travellers about Airbus aircraft. For example, it’s great to hear how much people enjoy flying on the A380.”


Companies large and small have always had to respond to their customers, so how is using via social media different to other communication channels? Anthony hits the nail on the head when he says that “As for the other media, you can’t just choose what you want to talk about! If people ask questions that you’re not comfortable with, you can’t escape, you have to answer! With social media this is even more relevant. The difference is that everything has to happen very quickly– which requires big companies to be agile enough to meet very short deadlines, for example in response to a customer request.”

What’s Anthony’s advice for Fly Your Ideas teams sharing their work-in-progress with the world across social channels? “First of all, be yourself! Engage with people – it’s a conversation. Be precise – a good discipline for everyone to learn. Make the most of limited space by using links. Most of all, consider what the reader will get from this – why should they read it? What value are you bringing? And I’m a big fan of using infographics. They really help to explain complex stories. Remember that people get hundreds of messages a day on social media, so if they don’t get your message right away, you could lose their interest!”

He adds that, “Round 2 teams will be finalising their projects in the hope of a place in the live final of Fly Your Ideas 2015. I’d certainly recommend making use of social media at this stage of the challenge. Get ideas and find new solutions from a worldwide audience made of other young people as passionate as you about innovation. You’re not alone! Reach out to the world.”


Fly Your Ideas: It’s Not Just About Winning!

Meet Vijay Kothari! He was team leader of Team Bucephalus from the Fly Your Ideas 2013 edition. Team Bucephalus made it to Round 2 of the challenge.

“As team leader, I learnt a lot about effective communication, being a team player and about dedication to a project. The most important thing I learnt was to complete tasks on time with no compromise in the quality of the work. Throughout the competition we had continued support from our Airbus Mentor and Expert and this really taught me and my team to interact effectively and efficiently.

Fly Your Ideas: It’s Not Just About Winning!

Meet Vijay Kothari! He was team leader of Team Bucephalus from the Fly Your Ideas 2013 edition. Team Bucephalus made it to Round 2 of the challenge.

“As team leader, I learnt a lot about effective communication, being a team player and about dedication to a project. The most important thing I learnt was to complete tasks on time with no compromise in the quality of the work. Throughout the competition we had continued support from our Airbus Mentor and Expert and this really taught me and my team to interact effectively and efficiently.

Our idea focused on the Efficiency Challenge. As air traffic continues to grow around the world, we need more aircraft to accommodate the demand. This has direct consequences on two of the most important environmental factors i.e. emissions and noise. Emissions can be reduced by cutting fuel consumption through improved aerodynamic efficiency. In the end, we worked on a project that focused on a concept called ‘Starlet’, which aimed to reduce the induced drag on an aircraft and improve the overall aerodynamic efficiency.

I personally believe Fly Your Ideas is not about winning or losing. It’s about thinking outside the box and converting your thoughts and ideas into reality. Fly Your Ideas was a once in a lifetime experience for myself and my team. Taking part in this challenge was a real game changer in my academic life and was one of my best and most cherished experiences to date. The Fly Your Idea competition gave me and my fellow team members an international platform to share our ideas and helped us to grow as young, thriving engineers and entrepreneurs.

Since taking part in Fly Your Ideas, I have completed my studies and I’m now working at GKN Aerospace in Bangalore, India. Fly Your Ideas gave me a real taste of applying my engineering knowledge to real world challenges and I still continue to apply this knowledge and experience throughout my working life today.’


Celebrating International Women’s Day with Team Bolleboos

On International Women’s Day we decided to mark the occasion by catching up with Team Bolleboos. They’re one of the two all-female teams in Round 2 of Fly Your Ideas 2015 along with Team CU Airpower from Cornell University, USA. Team Bolleboos are all doctoral students at City University London and hail from Spain, Italy and the Netherlands.


Celebrating International Women’s Day with Team Bolleboos

On International Women’s Day we decided to mark the occasion by catching up with Team Bolleboos. They’re one of the two all-female teams in Round 2 of Fly Your Ideas 2015 along with Team CU Airpower from Cornell University, USA. Team Bolleboos are all doctoral students at City University London and hail from Spain, Italy and the Netherlands.

So, was it a conscious decision on their part to form an all-female team? Evelien, Isabella and Judit from Team Bolleboos jointly reply that, “Yes, it was. We more or less started our PhDs together and we connected straight away. When we found out about Fly Your Ideas and decided to form a team, we thought it would be an opportunity to support each other, not only during Fly Your Ideas but also in our day-to-day work and life.

We get along really well and this helps a lot when working together and when discussing matters related to our research.”

We asked if they have experienced any challenges so far in their education, as women in traditionally male-dominated areas and Evelien comments that, “As women, I feel we have to prove ourselves more than men because it is assumed that we know less and that we can do less. But as soon as you prove yourself, you are respected.”

Isabella adds, “In my opinion, this is not a limit but more a challenge. Being able to demonstrate your own value makes everything easier”. For Judit, there’s an additional cultural benefit to consider, “I've studied in different countries and think that working with people from different backgrounds and cultures also has a positive impact.”

Finally, what’s the Team Bolleboos message for fellow female students considering taking part in Fly Your Ideas in the future?

“It is a great experience! It’s an exciting opportunity to build our confidence. Now we know that we can achieve anything we want as long as we believe in ourselves. We wouldn't think twice about participating again!”


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